tree: 8086f65994e5e211ba6f0ff9a727ad3370a8233d [path history] [tgz]
  1. Manifest
  2. OWNERS
  3. README.md
  4. files/
  5. ti50-sdk-0.0.1.ebuild
dev-embedded/ti50-sdk/README.md

ti50-sdk

This package is the toolchain for the ti50 effort (go/ti50). It‘s composed of a riscv-enabled C/C++ toolchain, and a riscv-enabled Rust toolchain. It’s currently supported by the ti50 team.

Upgrading

dev-embedded/ti50-sdk is logically composed of three parts: clang, newlib, and rust. It's possible to upgrade each of these independently.

That said, a common point between all of these is how sources are stored: a dev uses files/pack_git_tarball.py to pack a source tarball, then uploads said tarball to gs://chromeos-localmirror/distfiles.

Example per-project invocations of files/pack_git_tarball.py are available below. It‘s important to keep in mind that once you upload a new tarball and point the ti50-sdk ebuild at it, you need to run ebuild $(equery w dev-embedded/ti50-sdk) manifest. Otherwise, when you try to download these files from gs://chromeos-localmirror, you’ll get file integrity errors.

It‘s important to note that chromeos-localmirror is a large, shared bucket. Things uploaded to it aren’t “final” (e.g., feel free to update them) until a commit depending on them is landed. After such a commit lands, files aren't to be changed. You can read more here.

Additionally, any patches done to upstream sources should be done explicitly in the ebuild. Tarballs uploaded to chromeos-localmirror are expected to be clean and true mirrors of the sets of sources available upstream.

Upgrading clang

In order to upgrade clang, you‘ll need a tarball of clang‘s and LLVM’s sources at the SHA you’re interested in. Once you have that at ${dir}, you can create a git tarball:

files/pack_git_tarball.py --git-dir "${dir}" --output-prefix /tmp/llvm

This should give you a path that looks like /tmp/llvm-${sha}-src.tar.xz. You can now upload that to gs:

gsutil cp -n -a public-read /tmp/llvm-${sha}-src.tar.xz \
    gs://chromeos-localmirror/distfiles/llvm-${sha}-src.tar.xz

After running ebuild manifest as described in the section above, you should be able to start testing these changes via sudo emerge dev-embedded/ti50-sdk.

Upgrading newlib

In order to upgrade newlib, you'll need to pull it from its upstream repo. With that at ${dir}, you can create a git tarball:

files/pack_git_tarball.py --git-dir "${dir}" --output-prefix /tmp/newlib

This should give you a path that looks like /tmp/newlib-${sha}-src.tar.xz. You can now upload that to gs:

gsutil cp -n -a public-read /tmp/newlib-${sha}-src.tar.xz \
    gs://chromeos-localmirror/distfiles/newlib-${sha}-src.tar.xz

After running ebuild manifest as described in the section above, you should be able to start testing these changes via sudo emerge dev-embedded/ti50-sdk.

Upgrading rust

In order to upgrade rust, you'll need to pull it from its upstream repo. With that at ${dir}, you can create a git tarball. Note that Rust makes use of two things that add complexity here:

  • Submodules
  • Vendored dependencies

A convenient shorthand to ensure all submodules are at the correct revision is ${dir}/x.py help. You have to manually ensure all submodules are up-to-date before trying to pack rust's sources. Without this, things may be at inconsistent versions, which can lead to build errors.

Dependency vendoring is handled by passing an extra flag to files/pack_git_tarball.py. Your invocation should look something like:

files/pack_git_tarball.py --git-dir "${dir}" --output-prefix /tmp/rustc \
    --post-copy-command 'cargo vendor'

(Emphasis on “please ensure --post-copy-command 'cargo vendor' is specified.” Your build will break otherwise. :) )

This should give you a path that looks like /tmp/rustc-${sha}-src.tar.xz. You can now upload that to gs:

gsutil cp -n -a public-read /tmp/rustc-${sha}-src.tar.xz \
    gs://chromeos-localmirror/distfiles/rustc-${sha}-src.tar.xz

After running ebuild manifest as described in the section above, you should be able to start testing these changes via sudo emerge dev-embedded/ti50-sdk.

Iterative development

Standard ebuild development practices apply here: sudo emerge dev-embedded/ti50-sdk will clean everything up and start all builds from scratch. This is desirable in many cases, but not so much when trying to iterate with a broken toolchain.

The flow the author (gbiv@) used boiled down to sudo ebuild $(equery w dev-embedded/ti50-sdk) compile, which is much more lightweight when e.g., trying to figure out why Rust is broken, since it doesn't require a full, fresh build of LLVM + newlib on every iteration.